oldtimefamilybaseball

Mariano Rivera Picks Up 600th Save, Is One Behind Trevor Hoffman

oldtimefamilybaseball:

World sighs, asks “didn’t Rivera already pass him? I mean, I thought for sure we already agreed Rivera was the greatest closer in the history of the game. Because if not, we would have been making a bigger deal out of this. Not to say that it’s a crazy record, but you know, the guy works hard for a long time and passes some milestones, in the process becoming the all-time leader at the benchmark statistic for his position, I just thought we’d pay a little more attention. That’s all I’m saying.” 

You didn’t realize it, but most of the world’s population is needlessly verbose. 

There are perhaps no two more iconic players than Mariano Rivera and Ichiro Suzuki in the past decade, so it’s fitting that Rivera’s 600th save came when Ichiro was caught stealing in the bottom of the ninth. Rivera seemed to be enjoying himself as this photo proves: 

image

(AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Video embedded below for those who require further evidence: 

oldtimefamilybaseball
oldtimefamilybaseball:

Craig Counsell’s last hits came in a 3-for-4 game against the St. Louis Cardinals on June 10th. Since then he is 0-for-45, the second longest hitless streak for a position player in Major League history. 
That infamous record is held by Bill Bergen, a player widely known for being one of the worst offensive players of all-time. Bergen, who had a career .395 OPS and a 21 OPS+, once went 46 at-bats without hitting a safety. Craig Counsell, despite all his grit, leadership, and vampire-like paleness, could tie and pass him in his very next game. 
The above is Counsell’s “hit” chart over the last month and a half. Notice that the chart’s legend does not even include a marking for “hit.” At least he’s got a bobblehead coming out in two weeks, that should cheer him up. 
(Chart via Texas Leaguers) 

oldtimefamilybaseball:

Craig Counsell’s last hits came in a 3-for-4 game against the St. Louis Cardinals on June 10th. Since then he is 0-for-45, the second longest hitless streak for a position player in Major League history. 

That infamous record is held by Bill Bergen, a player widely known for being one of the worst offensive players of all-time. Bergen, who had a career .395 OPS and a 21 OPS+, once went 46 at-bats without hitting a safety. Craig Counsell, despite all his grit, leadership, and vampire-like paleness, could tie and pass him in his very next game. 

The above is Counsell’s “hit” chart over the last month and a half. Notice that the chart’s legend does not even include a marking for “hit.” At least he’s got a bobblehead coming out in two weeks, that should cheer him up. 

(Chart via Texas Leaguers

oldtimefamilybaseball

Josh Tomlin Holds a Major League Record

oldtimefamilybaseball:

29 starts into his career and with an awe-astounding ERA+ of 93, Josh Tomlin can now consider himself the Major League leader in outings lasting at least five innings to begin a career. The previous record holder was Daisuke Matsuzaka, everyone’s least favorite pitcher for his ability to last five innings and make it seem like nine. Congrats, Josh. 

Matthew Pouliet ran the numbers, and here is the rest of the field: 

  • Josh Tomlin – 29 (2009-10)
  • Daisuke Matsuzaka – 28 (2007)
  • Steve Rogers – 24 (1973-74)
  • Runelvys Hernandez – 21 (2002-03)
  • Chris Nabolz – 21 (1990-91)
  • Barry Zito – 20 (2000-01)
  • Howard Ehmke – 20 (1919)

Of course, the key word here is outings, so any starters who either began in relief or made a relief appearance during the course of their stretch are excluded. Still, any list that features Runelvys Hernandez is a list worth seeing.