Sometime after 10:30 on a Thursday morning in May, after he’d had his cup of coffee, Dick Trickle snuck out of the house. His wife didn’t see him go. He eased his 20-year-old Ford pickup out on the road and headed toward Boger City, N.C., 10 minutes away. He drove down Highway 150, a two-lane road that cuts through farm fields and stands of trees and humble country homes that dot the Piedmont west of Charlotte, just outside the reach of its suburban sprawl. Trickle pulled into a graveyard across the street from a Citgo station. He drove around to the back. It was sunny. The wind blew gently from the west. Just after noon, he dialed 911. The dispatcher asked for his address.
"Uh, the Forest Lawn, uh, Cemetery on 150," he said, his voice calm. The dispatcher asked for his name. He didn’t give it.
"On the backside of it, on the back by a ‘93 pickup, there’s gonna be a dead body," he said."OK," the woman said, deadpan.
"Suicide," he said. "Suicide."
"Are you there?"
"I’m the one."
"OK, listen to me, sir, listen to me."
"Yes, it’ll be 150, Forest Lawn Cemetery, in the back by a Ford pickup."
"OK, sir, sir, let me get some help to you."
Click.

Elegy of a race car driver: The good times, hard life, and shocking death of Dick Trickle http://sbn.to/1638l7p 

Sometime after 10:30 on a Thursday morning in May, after he’d had his cup of coffee, Dick Trickle snuck out of the house. His wife didn’t see him go. He eased his 20-year-old Ford pickup out on the road and headed toward Boger City, N.C., 10 minutes away. He drove down Highway 150, a two-lane road that cuts through farm fields and stands of trees and humble country homes that dot the Piedmont west of Charlotte, just outside the reach of its suburban sprawl. Trickle pulled into a graveyard across the street from a Citgo station. He drove around to the back. It was sunny. The wind blew gently from the west. Just after noon, he dialed 911. The dispatcher asked for his address.

"Uh, the Forest Lawn, uh, Cemetery on 150," he said, his voice calm. The dispatcher asked for his name. He didn’t give it.

"On the backside of it, on the back by a ‘93 pickup, there’s gonna be a dead body," he said."OK," the woman said, deadpan.

"Suicide," he said. "Suicide."

"Are you there?"

"I’m the one."

"OK, listen to me, sir, listen to me."

"Yes, it’ll be 150, Forest Lawn Cemetery, in the back by a Ford pickup."

"OK, sir, sir, let me get some help to you."

Click.

Elegy of a race car driver: The good times, hard life, and shocking death of Dick Trickle http://sbn.to/1638l7p 

heavens2betsy

heavens2betsy:

I like Brian Vickers, a lot actually, (since his rookie year) but this was not a positive race for him (not even including the fact that he tore his race car to bits). He influenced the outcome of the race. Out of 18 cautions, Brian was involved in 5. Two drivers attempted payback against him. And what might be the worst, he cost his good friend Jimmie Johnson a win in order to get his own attempt at retribution.

In the words of  Ricky Craven, “Forty-three cars started this race and I think Brian Vickers hit half of them.” Not many people are leaving Martinsville impressed with the 83.